We’re delighted to introduce something a little different from the norm, something less traditional and more alluring with a young, hip and modern sensibility.

Working with the South Korean team at SPC, we had great fun painting patterns and designing packaging for a new range of teas. Every tea has its own personality to reflect a different state of mind that the teas, each with different blends and flavours, promote.

Teatra’s colour palette is bright and colourful and we leveraged this, developing a range of patterns and illustrations. From First Break, Sisters, Young Grey, Cuz Mind to Mint Crew, each brew provides an emotional lift.

We are proud to say that our packaging has won a Red Dot award in Germany.

We have created the new visual identity and packaging for Metzger & Söhne, who have been making traditional Lebkuchen in Vienna for over 330 years. The unique taste has inspired emperors and kings over the centuries. K.u.K. stands for kaiserlich und königlich (imperial and royal) and the title has been awarded to Metzger & Söhne as an Imperial Court Supplier.

Inspired by the neoclassical architecture of Vienna, Metzger & Söhne’s craftsmanship and commitment to the best ingredients, including their star organic Austrian honey, we created a decorative wreath that grows out of an ornamental beehive. This illustration has become a core visual asset for the brand and is used across packaging and marketing materials.

The colour theme is a combination of deep regal reds and blues mixed with lighter pastels adapted from the Viennese fashion and architecture of the time.

The design had to be timeless just like their gingerbread recipe. For over 300 years Metzger & Söhne have been letting their dough gently mature over a number of months. You can (and we did) taste the difference. Delicious.

Packaging is just another format or touchpoint for a brand to reach its audience. Right?

Yes, however it also requires the juggling skills of an octopus to ensure that everything works together seamlessly. There aren’t many other design tasks that require so much detailed thought for each square cm of space.

The usual considerations around audience, sector, product, competitors and ambitions first need to be thoroughly investigated. Then comes the ‘feel’ with aesthetics, format and usability. Mix all that with the practical concerns of production, finishing, distribution, on-line ‘thumbnail’ appeal, shelf space, environmental concerns and compliance and you already have a lot to think about.

But we also need to create the on-pack hierarchy, by which customers will navigate the range. How will we lead the eye around such a small area to communicate all that there is to say, in a priority order of importance? When the number of SKUs is large, the way in which we segment the range into smaller ‘families’ (by ingredient, type, function or result) and what features we use to do this (colour, format, image or messaging) become increasingly important. Get it wrong and it will be hard to add to the range at a later date. Get it right and everything becomes easier and more intuitive.

We’ve recently been thinking about the nuances of on-pack information rather a lot as we re-designed the entire Boots food range and refreshed the branding for QMS Medicosmetics.

We’ll never find the right systematic approach, as there isn’t one. Understanding the rules is as important as breaking them when the time is right. But what we know for certain is that we love the juggle, we love the different and complementary skills that come together in our packaging projects and we love it when multiple considerations and decisions come together in a way that looks natural and effortless.